Spacer
PedifixBannerAS4_319
Spacer
PresentBannerCU1221
Spacer
PMbannerE7-913.jpg
PMWebSurveyBanner122
Podiatry Management Online


Facebook

Podiatry Management Online
Podiatry Management Online


AmerXGY1221r2

Search

 
Search Results Details
Back To List Of Search Results

06/16/2021    

RESPONSES/COMMENTS (NON-CLINICAL)



From: Paul T Slowik, DPM


 


All this talk about parity with MDs/DOs and now comparing our training with NPs and PAs is baffling. Maybe it’s because I practiced in a progressive city of Oceanside, CA, but we were considered physicians by patients, hospitals, physicians, and other sub-specialties in every way. In my opinion, we are not limited by our license, but only ourselves and our own self-perception. I acted like a physician and was treated as such. We are not primary care providers nor were we trained to be them. Do you think a hand orthopedic surgeon wonders if he is a physician or “real doctor” because he/she knows they are not PCPs?


 


Most of podiatrists’ problems originate in their own head. If you believe in yourself, others will too.


 


Paul T Slowik, DPM, Oceanside, CA

Other messages in this thread:


01/07/2022    

RESPONSES/COMMENTS (NON-CLINICAL) - PART 2



From: Daniel Waldman, DPM


 


Over the past few years, I have also received more and more faxes from pharmacies (CVS accounts for probably over 90% of these faxes) stating that a patient expects to pick up the refill in a couple of days. When my staff calls the patient, they have no idea why this was sent as they have not requested the refill. I’ve called the pharmacists directly and they admit that the patient did not request a refill but the higher-ups at corporate management are instructing the refill request to be sent to physicians. When I asked the pharmacists why this is happening, they have flat out told me it’s all about corporate profits and they cannot do anything to change the system. The pharmacists seem genuinely interested in providing the best care but they are simply cogs in the machine of the corporations.


 


I wonder how many physicians simply sign off on these refill requests and patients are continuing to take medication that they no longer need. I have worked with a couple of law firms around the country about unsolicited/unauthorized faxes. A few years ago, I settled out of court with a company for a five-figure payout. This was not a pharmacy. Although class action lawsuits can be effective, they take many years and plaintiff awards are capped. The law firms make the majority of the payouts. Perhaps it’s time for congressional hearings?


 


Daniel Waldman, DPM, Asheville, NC 

01/07/2022    

RESPONSES/COMMENTS (NON-CLINICAL) - PART 1



From: Donald R Blum, DPM, JD


 


My dermatologist accepts Medicare assignment but does not accept other insurances. When you accept assignment, it is "ONLY" for services that you know are not excluded from coverage. For services that are excluded, you can accept payment at time of the service. 


 


If you follow the CMS rules and guidelines strictly, I think you should do okay. All services provided to diabetic patients (whether on Medicare or not) are not necessarily a covered service if the patient does not meet the class findings (Q7, Q8, Q9).


 


One more item - remember for 2022, there may be a decrease in the Medicare reimbursements (due to fee reductions and sequestrations).


 


Donald R Blum, DPM, JD, Dallas, TX

01/06/2022    

RESPONSES/COMMENTS (NON-CLINICAL) - PART 2



From: Brian Kiel, DPM


 


I don’t disagree with Dr. Ressler as to ON shoes being the hot fashion shoe but to call it or to refer to it as a running shoe is completely wrong. New Balance, Brooks, ASICS, and Saucony are running/walking shoes. These companies are using  technology to determine what needs to go into their products. ON uses eyes to determine theirs.


 


Our job is to guide our patients, and honestly my patients seem to appreciate and follow my recommendations as to the correct brand of shoes. ON shoes are fine to wear to the movies (whenever that is) but not as a replacement for proper athletic shoes.


 


Brian Kiel, DPM, Memphis, TN

01/06/2022    

RESPONSES/COMMENTS (NON-CLINICAL) - PART 1



From: Ron Freireich, DPM, Burton Katzen, DPM


 


We had this exact problem here in Ohio and we checked with our patients to see if they initiated the refills. They too did not request the refills.  We filed a complaint with the State of Ohio Pharmacy Board. The faxes quickly stopped.


 


Ron Freireich, DPM, Cleveland, OH


 


Unfortunately, with the single sheet faxes of today, even when you mark unsubscribe, they still keep coming and it is hard to stop. Many years ago, I was getting 3-4 faxes a day from one company advertising office furniture. At the time, we had a fax that used a paper roll, and I attached 3 pages together (top of the 1st one to the bottom of the last one) that said UNSUBSCRIBE, called the number and left for the night. Surprise!! No more faxes from them. I always had a vision of them not being able to get in the office the next morning because of the mass of paper blocking the door.


 


Burton Katzen, DPM, Temple Hills, MD

01/05/2022    

RESPONSES/COMMENTS (NON-CLINICAL) - PART 3



From: Brian Kiel, DPM


 


My premiums were going up significantly as well. My insurance company gave several options and I chose the one that does not increase my coverage by the cost of living. As a result, my premium was cut by 2/3. It is a chance to do this but I feel I will be able to cover any difference.


 


Brian Kiel, DPM, Memphis, TN

01/05/2022    

RESPONSES/COMMENTS (NON-CLINICAL) - PART 2


RE: ON Running Shoes


From: Jack Ressler, DPM


 


As podiatrists, we are always trying to recommend the best supporting athletic shoes to our patients. On several occasions it becomes very frustrating treating patients only to deal with their non-compliance due to "heavy or ugly" shoes. As an alternative, I have been researching "ON" running and athletic shoes quite extensively and have found several models to provide good support while checking the boxes of providing support and pleasing aesthetics. 


 


My philosophy has always been to get patients to purchase shoes that they will wear as opposed to them continuing to wear their Keds and other brands just because they feel good. Let's face it, getting them to wear Brooks Beast or Ariel, New Balance 1540 and others is not always an easy sell. As most of you know, ON shoes are setting the fashion world on...


 


Editor's note: Dr. Ressler's extended-length can be read here. 

01/05/2022    

RESPONSES/COMMENTS (NON-CLINICAL) - PART 1


RE: Autofax Pharmacy Refills


From: Keith L. Gurnick, DPM


 


My office often receives far too many faxes from pharmacies asking me to authorize prescription refills for my patients. This past year, before authorizing or declining the refill, I called or sent an e-mail to each patient, asking them if they wanted or needed the refill and if they had requested the refill. To my surprise, almost 100% of the time, the patient said they knew nothing about the fax, and had not initiated any request and they did not need the medication any longer.


 


My office is inundated with faxes on a daily basis from outsourced carriers asking for medical records, physical therapists who send cut and pasted medical records asking for my signature and a return fax to authorize continued care, and these unwanted faxes from pharmacies for prescription medication refills that were never requested by anyone. My office has to send back a reply fax to the pharmacy denying the request for the refill, or they will continue to send the faxes many times.


 


Any suggestions on how to curtail these endless unwanted faxes would be appreciated. I am aware that I could get rid of my fax machine but I also receive faxes (MRI reports, etc.) that are important such as insurance credit card payment vouchers and others. Can't something be done on a legislative level to stop the pharmacies from auto-faxing prescription refills when no one ever asked for the refill?


 


Keith L. Gurnick, DPM, Los Angeles, CA

12/21/2021    

RESPONSES/COMMENTS (NON-CLINICAL)



From: Robert G. Smith DPM, MSc, RPh


 


First, early in my podiatric career, I wrote to the Florida Board of Podiatric Medicine and requested a declaratory statement centered on giving tetanus vaccines and boosters. I received a positive clarification validating my belief. My hope is that the readership will understand that the nationwide push for pharmacists to be allowed to vaccinate patients was orchestrated by both state and national pharmacy associations and endorsed by large chain pharmacy companies. Florida Medicare pays the pharmacy, not the individual pharmacist, $66.43 for the medication as well as $16.59 administration fee for a total of $83.02.


 


Prior to going to podiatric medical school as a pharmacist, I worked with the Florida state pharmacy board and state associations (FPA, FHSP) and at the time, U of Fla (my employer) to enhance the pharmacist’s midlevel role. I helped usher in...


 


Editor's note: Dr. Smith's extended-length letter can be read here.

12/14/2021    

RESPONSES/COMMENTS (NON-CLINICAL) - PART 1



From: Elliot Udell, DPM


 


Kudos to Dr. Simmons for bringing up an issue that has long affected and annoyed all of us. When we write a prescription for a topical antifungal, we never know if the patient's insurance company will either allow it, reject it, or hit the patient with a "million dollar" co-payment for it. The latter will generally result in either the patient and/or the pharmacy chasing after us to try to find an alternative antifungal that is covered with a reasonable co-payment. 


 


Since many topical antifungals are OTC products and many of our podiatry suppliers are happy to stock our shelves with them, dispensing these products is a good option. If the patient must get the medication via his or her pharmacy, one method that has worked well with us is to write for a specific cream and give the pharmacist permission to substitute an alternative topical antifungal that is covered by the patient's insurance company. This avoids calls back and forth from the pharmacy while the pharmacy staff searches for the product that will be covered. 


 


Elliot Udell, DPM, Hicksville, NY

12/10/2021    

RESPONSES/COMMENTS (NON-CLINICAL) - PART 1B



From: Dieter J Fellner, DPM


 


Reinforcing the notion of a Cinderella service since time immemorial, the podiatric physician-surgeon is not 'permitted' to administer COVID-19 vaccinations. There is an extensive, and growing, online debate about the fact that those staff, with lesser training and education, yet legally empowered to do so, have no idea about aspiration, prior to injection. 


 


Increasingly, the intravascular injection is now linked to adverse health sequelae, such as increased coronary syndrome with a spike in myocardial infarctions. This important aspect of injection technique is second nature to all podiatrists. This is a global problem. Our 'leaders' are again failing the nations of the world adding to their catalogue of shame in managing this 'crisis'.


 


 Dieter J Fellner, DPM, NY, NY

12/10/2021    

RESPONSES/COMMENTS (NON-CLINICAL) - PART 1A



From: Elliot Udell, DPM


 


This issue has been discussed for quite a few years in this forum. Why is it that pharmacists can administer many vaccinations and podiatrists and dentists who give injections all day long, cannot? During the height of the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic, some states in the U.S., including my own, issued temporary permission for podiatrists to administer COVID-19 vaccinations but only under the supervision of one of the other professionals.


 


A number of our colleagues took advantage of this and generously volunteered their time giving shots at mass vaccination centers. The fact that this did not lead to allowing us to give flu and COVID-19 shots permanently, does not do justice to the public, especially in areas where a podiatrist or dentist is the only healthcare professional that some elderly people see.  


 


Elliot Udell, DPM, Hicksville, NY

12/09/2021    

RESPONSES/COMMENTS (NON-CLINICAL)



From: Name Withheld (Canada)


 


Borders don’t change this situation. In Ontario, Canada, Pharmacists, RNs, NPs, and RPNs (who after their GED, complete a 4-semester college program) are permitted, by law to administer flu and COVID-19 vaccines but not so for podiatric physicians. A pharmacist said that they are paid $13 per jab. 


 


The container box has vaccines for up to 100 persons. ID is recorded from each individual and a laptop with access to the Internet and a printer are required. A crash cart with Epi-pens is also necessary to have on hand. The gross income made for a day administering 100 shots is $1,300. The real benefit is that it would be good PR for the podiatry clinic. It doesn’t happen. The pharmacy gets the public perception of providing a beneficial medical service.


 


Name Withheld (Canada)

12/08/2021    

RESPONSES/COMMENTS (NON-CLINICAL) - PART 2


RE: In-Person Conferences and the Omicron Variant


From: Jeffrey Kass, DPM,


 


Medical necessity are words podiatrists grapple with on a regular basis. Recently, three New York podiatrists (Drs. Chaskin, Jaffe, Udell) discussed whether NYSPMA should livestream their 2022 Clinical conference in order to reasonably accommodate those immunocompromised or at high risk the opportunity to participate. Dr. Jaffe informed us that he would not attend. With the recent outbreak of the omicron variant, and New York State under a state of emergency, is an in-person conference medically necessary and prudent? Why take unnecessary risks of potentially causing colleagues to possibly get ill or transmit the virus to others? 


 


This past weekend, I participated in Desert Foot’s online conference. Anyone who attended can verify that one can learn from an online conference as much as from an in-person conference.


 


Jeffrey Kass, DPM, Forest Hills, NY

12/08/2021    

RESPONSES/COMMENTS (NON-CLINICAL) - PART 1


RE: No Sane Rationale for Prohibiting DPMs to Vaccinate


From: Name Withheld (TX)


 


I do not understand the world we live in. In Texas (and perhaps other states), DPMs cannot give flu shots or COVID-19 vaccines. Is this insane? RNs, LVNs, NPs, and mid-levels can give these injections but not podiatric physicians. DPMs are trained in administering injections and dealing with adverse reactions much better than the local pharmacist. The reason given for not allowing DPMs to give these vaccines? Flu and Covid are systemic illnesses. Crazy!


 


Name Withheld (TX)

11/16/2021    

RESPONSES/COMMENTS (NON-CLINICAL) - PART 2



From: Robert D Teitelbaum, DPM


 


On August 26th, PM News published my post on the disappearance of a nutraceutical - N acetyl cysteine - from the Amazon retail site. N acetyl cysteine is used by cystic fibrosis and covid patients as a preventative for respiratory symptoms. It is also mentioned by Peter McCullogh, MD, an expert in the treatment of COVID-19, and by the FLCCC, which is the "Frontline Covid Critical Care" alliance as part of the 'neutraceutical mix', along with zinc, selenium, etc., where research has shown they are useful in blunting the effect of the virus. It is still missing from Amazon. Look-a-likes, sound-a-likes abound on every site, but no "NAC".


 


It is not toxic, habit forming, nor effects blood clotting, etc. It may be no better nor worse than many other supplements. But we, the public, are being 'protected' from purchasing it. An additional note: I saw my internist in September and related this story to her. She surprisingly said, "Oh, they're using a lot of that in the hospital." We both did not have time to pursue what was a "You're kidding me!" moment. So, for the last 5 months, NAC has been unavailable on Amazon (thank G-d for ebay), but the hospitals are using it for the treatment of COVID-19? Is there someone out there who can explain this without expressing a political narrative?


 


Robert D Teitelbaum, DPM, Naples, FL

11/16/2021    

RESPONSES/COMMENTS (NON-CLINICAL) - PART 1B



From: Burton J Katzen, DPM



 


After reading Dr. Wallace's "Advice from a Retiring Podiatrist", as another podiatrist contemplating retirement, several things come to mind.. My first thought was of Mickey Mantle, Willie Mays, Sandy Koufax, etc. who were "born too early". I believe Dr. Wallace would have been happier in our wonderful profession practicing as a chiropodist in the 1st half of the 20th century. It's hard to imagine practicing the same way and with the same techniques as when I graduated in 1971 and not trying to learn new innovations and techniques.


 


I can't help but feel sorry for him that his way of practicing has robbed him of the utter joy of permanently correcting thousands of painful deformities of his patients and the joy of trying new innovations that might have greatly improved his patients’ outcome and lifestyle. However, if that worked for Dr. Wallace, neither I nor anyone else should judge the way he practiced.


 


I find it hard to believe that Dr. Wallace's other such positive lifestyle choices, which I mostly agree with, are in such conflict with the advice he has given; with the possibility of permanently changing lives and allowing his patients to partake in the same joys of life, one such joy being long non-painful walks by providing the latest treatment options available, basically advising us to stay status quo as a profession. Anyway, if another close-to-retiring podiatrist might give advice, do whatever it takes to achieve the practice and life goals you have set for yourself, keep learning, and advancing your skills, give your patients the best and latest treatments available, and don't listen to anyone else's advice on how you should live your life or practice your profession.


 


Burton J Katzen, DPM, Temple Hills, MD


11/16/2021    

RESPONSES/COMMENTS (NON-CLINICAL) - PART 1A



From: Stephen Musser, DPM, Ivar E. Roth DPM, MPH


 


Well done and written. I agree with every point you mentioned. For those of our colleagues who have been practicing less than 8 years, you will come to find this advice is well thought out and true.


 


Stephen Musser, DPM, Cleveland, OH


 


Congrats on your retirement George. Thanks for your advice. I would add though, that if you are conservative and do NOT sell surgery, you should inform patients and let them make the decision to have surgery or not; you will save yourself a lot of headaches. You will do less surgery, but since the patient made the decision, you will be safe from criticism.


 


Ivar E. Roth DPM, MPH, Newport Beach, CA 

11/11/2021    

RESPONSES/COMMENTS (NON-CLINICAL) - PART 1


RE: Why Doesn't Government Help?


From: Jeffrey Kass, DPM


 


If the government wants doctors to report information so badly, i.e. MIPS and/or MACRA info, why doesn’t it provide the resources to the doctors to perform those tasks? Similarly, if they want all providers to be utilizing EHR, would it not make more sense for the government to supply the program free-of-charge so that everyone would be utilizing the same program? This way, when someone logs in, they will have access to their patients' charts. This would be a productive way to prevent duplicity of testing and make records easily accessible to other providers. 


 


Instead, all doctors are paying computer programmers, registries, etc. and doctors are still ordering duplicate studies and having difficulty getting reports or studies from other doctors. Bottom line seems to be a negative for doctors. One would think it may be smart to make life easier for doctors so that they could devote more time to the care of their patients. 


 


Jeffrey Kass, DPM, Forest Hills, NY

11/10/2021    

RESPONSES/COMMENTS (NON-CLINICAL) PART 1B



From: Robert Kornfeld, DPM


 



I’ve used Traumeel and many other homeopathic injections since 1987. I’ve never had one bad reaction. Not one. I’m sure I’ve administered nearly 200,000 injections of this type with generally excellent results. So why is it off the market? Big Pharma? Hello? You there? That said, you can safely use prolotherapy or PRP on tendons with confidence.


 


My only caveat is to consider your patient. If they have a burdened immune system, your results will be less than stellar. Also, these techniques do not work well with patients on NSAIDs, steroids, or immunosuppressants. Sarapin will not foster healing. It is used for pain relief (works great) but that medicine will probably soon disappear as well.


 


Robert Kornfeld, DPM, NY, NY


11/03/2021    

RESPONSES/COMMENTS (NON-CLINICAL)



From: Richard A Simmons, DPM


 


If your practice was significantly impacted by COVID-19, the HRSA paperwork should be straightforward. For instance, some offices chose not to close for two months in 2020; some offices do not derive a significant portion of their income from Medicare Part B; some offices did not lose patients or a significant portion of patients and so finding justification for the money could be difficult. An office that survives mostly off of Medicare Part B, that shut down for two months and was unable to get unemployment relief (for instance, in Florida the system was so overloaded that people could not get into the system to file, however, once they got in there was nothing set up to pay them for the weeks of lost pay due to the inefficient State computer system), and lost patients – this office will have no problem showing justification for the money.  


 


I am sure that every podiatry office was impacted from things as small as the cost of face masks for everyone to revamping the air filtration/HVAC in their offices. I know I had to spend more time with each patient to make them comfortable. I wrote a stock letter to every patient explaining the changes that my office had implemented and asked them to please make suggestions to things they saw that they thought could be improved upon. Chances are your office personnel had to spend more time comforting patients, also.


 


Richard A. Simmons, DPM, Rockledge, FL

11/02/2021    

RESPONSES/COMMENTS (NON-CLINICAL) -PART 2



From: Name Withheld


 


After posting the initial query about this topic, I again reviewed the form needed to be submitted along with the 34-page instructional guide. Although the form is lengthy and ambiguous, it began to make some sense. Please note, this is my interpretation. If it’s incorrect, I would appreciate further clarification. If you are a sole practitioner without other complicated entities, the section that needs to be filled out asks for your business and medical expenses from the four quarters of 2020, along with the first two quarters of 2021.


 


For most, basic rent would probably be enough to substantiate the amount of your “grant”. Add to that malpractice, salaries, and other overhead expenses, we should all be in the clear. Obviously, if you ignore reporting, I’m sure you will be getting a refund request. Filling out this form in a timely manner will allow you to contest any potential payback request if any section is answered incorrectly. Take your time, look over the guide, and if necessary, call provider support. They should be able to help.


 


Name Withheld 

11/02/2021    

RESPONSES/COMMENTS (NON-CLINICAL) -PART 1



From: Robert Scott Steinberg, DPM


 


First, the money that states make on conferences is not huge, but what they do make lowers members' dues. Second, for those who have medical reasons not to attend in person, there should be an online option. You have to weigh the need against being able to fill the exhibit hall. It can't be open-ended. The person should have to apply.


 


Robert Scott Steinberg, DPM, Schaumburg, IL

11/01/2021    

RESPONSES/COMMENTS (NON-CLINICAL) - PART 3B



From: Alan Sherman, DPM


 


As co-founder and owner of PRESENT e-Learning Systems, I can assure you that we are committed to running virtual live streaming conferences forever, even after we return to live in-person events. COVID has taught many thousands of our colleagues that live streaming conferences are a great learning experience and a painless way of earning your CME credits and keeping up with the latest advances in the profession. Many have told us that they prefer them to live in-person events, particularly the ability to view lectures at their own pace and go back to them for a month after they run live. 


 


We also run a live one-hour CME webinar each week that many take advantage of. Finally, at any one time, there are over 400 on-demand CME lectures in the PRESENT Podiatry Online CME Lecture Hall. We serve up hundreds of on-demand lectures a day and deliver almost 100,000 CME credits a year, many of them online. Virtual has proven itself these last few years to be a preference for many podiatrists…but I do look forward to running live meetings again, which we plan to do in early 2022, because they are uniquely fun and satisfying professional experiences for us all.


 


Alan Sherman, DPM, CEO, PRESENT e-Learning Systems

11/01/2021    

RESPONSES/COMMENTS (NON-CLINICAL) - PART 3A



From Elliot Udell, DPM


 


I understand where Dr. Jaffe and others are coming from. The COVID-19 pandemic is not over, and people who are undergoing chemotherapy or have other conditions that compromise their immunity should not under any circumstances mingle in large crowds, It’s not worth it. On the other hand, big conventions make huge amounts of money from the convention booth rooms where companies pay large amounts to display their products.


 


Live meetings are also educational in their own right because we all learn about new products from these vendors at conventions, and in many cases, get to try out samples of new products. The bottom line is that until the pandemic really becomes history, conventions should allow doctors to choose between attending in-person and on the computer.


 


Elliot Udell, DPM, Hicksville, NY

11/01/2021    

RESPONSES/COMMENTS (NON-CLINICAL) - PART 1



From: Name Withheld 1, Neil Levin, DPM


 


Like Name Withheld, I have not been able to fill out this time-consuming form and will be paying my CPA money to complete it. I never asked for the funds, nor did I sign an agreement prior to the funds showing up in my bank account. I had no way to refuse the funds. I wonder what legal recourse the government really has if I never agreed to terms? This reminds me of the line, "I'm from the government, I'm here to help you."


 


Name Withheld 1



 


I too, thought the HRSA reporting was quite daunting, especially the 35-page pdf they offer for "instructions". There is a help line number to call on the e-mail letter you reference. Before you incur expensive professional accounting fees, try calling the help line. They answered quickly and they were knowledgeable and helpful. I called them several times during the reporting process. 


 


Neil Levin, DPM, Sycamore, IL

DPMPrefBanner?618


Our privacy policy has changed.
Click HERE to read it!